Conservation

Conservation Spotlight: Manta Rays

Across the globe different groups of people and organizations put n many hours of work to protect our marine environment. Today we highlight the work being done by The Marine Megafauna Foundation SE Asia.

courtesy of scubadiverlife.com

The Marine Megafauna Foundation SE Asia is working in and around Indonesia to protect the area’s manta rays. Here we’ll chat with one of the organization’s founders.

Originally an independent organization founded to research manta rays in Indonesia, Marine Megafauna SE Asia is running several conservation and education programs in and around Indonesia. They have a strong focus on manta-ray protection. Today we’re chatting with Helen Mitchell, one of the founders of Marine Megafauna Foundation SE Asia.

“Our primary focus is always conservation,” says Mitchell. “So now that we have helped get manta rays nationwide protection in Indonesia, we are keen to pioneer, participate and help with any other issues that affect the marine environment, and especially these gentle giants.”

Conservation Spotlight: Marine Megafauna Foundation (SE Asia)

Manta Rays are some of the most beautiful and elegant swimmers in the oceans so they make a fantastic sight when caught on camera in their natural habitat …

 

Manta Rays In The News

Meanwhile more research continues in Western Australia as we try to understand the biology and ecology of different marine species.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-01-23/western-australian-manta-rays-thriving-as-worldwide-numbers-drop/8203974A team of researchers has been learning more about the behaviours of reef, or coastal, manta rays (Manta alfredi) on Western Australia’s north-west coast.

Project Manta was begun in 2007 due to a shortage of scientific knowledge of manta rays’ basic biology and ecology. Mr McGregor has been compiling information about mantas around Ningaloo Reef since 2000 and has found there are more than 800 individual manta rays frequenting the Coral Bay region.

Project Manta was begun in 2007 due to a shortage of scientific knowledge of manta rays’ basic biology and ecology.

Manta rays are fished in unsustainable numbers globally due to an Asian medicinal market built on the belief that gill rakers — filters used by the ray to separate water from food — have healing properties. read more at abc.net.au

 

 

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